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Rubbish fonts are more memorable, ditch usability and make the brain work for the information.

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Edited by Jonathan Vernon, Tuesday, 13 Nov 2012, 20:46

From BBC Radio 4 Today New scientific research reveals that students learn better when learning is made harder, specifically when using a font that is more challenging to read. Neuroscience blogger Jonah Lehrer discusses his own gut feeling that we remember ugly fonts much more easily.

 

Comically ugly fonts are the best.

 

So perhaps I should blog like this?

 

Ugly%20Fonts%20make%20it%20memorable.JPG

Try these:

 

Anglo%20Zulu%20Wars%20FONT%20GRAB.JPG

 

And what about handwriting?

 

DSC00372.JPG

 

'It’s a really interesting way to convey information', says Jonah Lehrer, 'as it can take a lot of work to decipher handwriting'.

 

How about these for examples if you’ve forgotten what handwriting looks like?


 

Diary%20Grab%20%20JAN%205%20FIVES%20FLIP%20GRAB.JPG

 

or this?

 

Dodgey%20Handwriting%20example.JPG

 

Let's get back to handwriting.

Or find a way to handwrite here. With a stylus and tablet?

The handwritten note, letter, or journal entry tells you something about the writer' mood, gender, age, level of education (or intoxication), even their occupation.

I've collected hand-written letters between 1969 and 1993 from family members and friends, including my grandfather whose 1918 RAF Log Book I feature above. If ever published, these artefacts will be best read in their original form rather than transcribed.

 

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Picture of David Wilson

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Along the same theme; I was once told that when writing is all capitalised, it forces us to actually read it rather than just skimming. Apparently this aids the memorability of headings and key phrases.

 

Not sure how accurate this information is, I have been told many things over the years!

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I'LL TRY ANYTHING ONCE. TEST THE WATER. WITH DIFFERENCE AUDIENCES. I'd like this to be tested empirically.
Picture of Vicky Fraser

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I saw that article. I think it's true - I often find I can't remember what I've been reading about, no matter how engaging it is. I guess making notes helps, when it comes to studying.

It makes sense to me that you retain more if it's more of an effort to read it. I remember Will Self's books because I have to have a dictionary by my side when I read them! He is the master of obscure but excellent words.

I have added your blog to my blogroll, in my efforts to read more smile Also, it's enjoyable.

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Vicky, I agree about Will Self. I feel compelled to read him, though find myself baging my head in anger at his choice of words sometimes, not only the ones that require a dictionary to interpret!