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Reflecting on the exam process

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The MAODE has no exams, it is all done through assignments. The MBA module I am doing, 'Creativity, Innovation & Change' has three two TMAs and ECA and an exam. The exam is the clincher.

An exam obliges you to do things in a very different way. You not only have to be able to tap into your memory banks, but you need to be able to drill deep enough for substance and then wrap this around the exam questions.

With a TMA all you have to do is wrap what you can pick out of the course books, notes and resources (on the basis that you have read the materials and know where it all is).

Surely as a form of assessment the exam is a crucial form of judging how mauch a person has taken in? Whether they have engaged extensively, iteratively and collaboratively with their student cohort and tutor during the module or whether they have confined themselves to a room with the resources and picked their way through them (or a bit of both).

In addition to the exam and assignment I rather like the idea of the viva, though I have never faced one. This suits my mind set and probably my way of learning, I like to hear what I have to say and respond to others. And I write the way I think, as stream of consciousness.

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Picture of Susan Whelan

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Hi Jonathan.  Hope it's going well.  I've never had a Viva.  The nearest I've come to it is a poster presentation which I absolutely dreaded, but in the end found it really enjoyable.  I take your point about exams, but I think they can be so stressful for some people that they don't always give an accurate picture of what a student has learned.  I love your revision techniques and will remember them when I come to the final revision stage.

Take care, Sue smile

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Thanks Sue. A pass will do on this one. I genuinely feel that my mind turned to Teflon many years ago. In fact, I've made it a professional skill that nothing sticks as I have been working in an 'ideas' industry.

I'm having fun with the anagrams and phrases.

'I could use a colourful swimming costume' is one which gives me the letters:

I C U C S C

These (I'm having to look it up) give me key words to define what in business MBA terms is a 'wicked problem', which form my perspective means that its complex, unlikely ever to be resolved and so warrants 'creative problem solving' techniques.

  • Interconnectedness
  • Complicatedness
  • Uncertainty
  • Ambiguity
  • Conflict
  • Societal Constraints

These from characters Mason and Mitroff (1981) which douns like jewellers to me!

I'll post this in the blog as a few from the MBA programme have got wind of the blog in the last two weeks of the five month module.