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The Shallows - Nicholas Carr - and why you shouldn't bother reading it

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Edited by Jonathan Vernon, Saturday, 23 Feb 2013, 07:43

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This isn't a promotion; I'm reading it so that you don't have to.

It has very little to say on the Internet. Rather it is a potted, amateurish and personable ramble through the history of communications and communications technologies from cunieform to the Rubix cube.

I fell asleep in chapter five.

Not that I'm incapable of 'deep reading' or seeing a book through to the end. I'm a sucker for John Grisham. I fell asleep and dreamt I was reading his book on a chair lift and forgot to get off at the top and started coming back down again - if this happens they have to stop the thing and wind you back. This was a bad dream for Nicholas Carr - the dream was telling me to drop this dreadful distraction. I have proper reading to do on webscience, neuroscience and e-learning. The kind that is written by academics, published in journals, found in the OU library then gathered up in RefWorks for later consumption.

Carr is one of those irritating humanities MAs who believes that Plutarch and Socrates have more insight on the Web and neuroscience and psychology then the leading academics of our age from the OU, OII or WebSciences at SOTON. In fact anyone who might disagree with him has of course been ignored.

I feel as if I am doing one of those party games where you have to eat as many cheese biscuits as possible. The only satisfying thing is tearing out the pages I have read and putting them in the Guinea-pig. For this I am grateful for not having a digital version.

Still, I'll hopefully be able to convince people to stop quoting Carr as the next Messiah by pointing out why and how he is beating his own drum in a one sided fashion on every page.

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Picture of Mat Woolfenden

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fun postsmile

SOTON?  Southampton Uni?  My uni?

 

Design Museum

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yes, Soton - Dame Prof Wendy Hall, Nicholas Shadbolt, Sir Tim Berners-Lee, Leslie Carr ... and others whose names currently escape me. I'm applying to the WebSciences PhD programme.