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Stages of E-Learning Design

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I believe the provenance of this blog post it my analysis of the stages of e-learning design taught during the MAODE, modelled on the OU's approach and based on Gilly Salmon's 'five steps' of e-tivities. Though EMA suggests it was part of an 'End of Module Assessment'. It looks handy so I want to know I have it somewhere!

What you should do (the corporate perspective):

Identify a clear business problem or opportunity to which e-learning can be effectively applied.

Choose the provider based on two things:

  1. their clear solution to the business need

  2. a means of measuring the value that solution delivers

H800 EMA on Learning Schedule (OU MAODE) Flowchart

Learning Technologist 

Course

Students

Tutor

Work to support students onto the ‘learning journey’ we’ve created. Field technical, subject and course questions where necessary turning to IT or the Tutor. 

Introduction

Activity Details and Schedule

Resources

References

Outcomes

Read through activity

Gather thoughts

Gallery of photos

Blogs

Share something

Set up notices, links and timings for activities and resources in VLE

Prompt actions

Handle matters arising


Moderate/Mediate the ice-breaker. Even if the students know each other, the LT will be new to them, and possibly the room too. Support individual students to locate, grab and load an image. Add captions and tags. 

Activity Ice-Breaker

Share experience, knowledge and insights relating to this part of the course. 

Have them share something about their personal experience of the platform or topic. 

A task they enjoyed, a memorable event, a tool they have come to love or loathe. What are their expectations for the next year? 

Insights into students and expectations. 


Encourage them to study independently.


Set this as an assignment.


Give grade and feedback. Or quiz them on it at next session. 

Help them put these thoughts/memories down somewhere in words or with visuals. (This can be preparation for adding something to the blog later on).

Share your ideas with others. Read and comment. Create lengthier blog entry with photos, drawings or maps. Seek out and share further references. 




Discover and link to  content related blogs. Save the links to these. Add a note on them and maybe do a screengrab. 




Collaborate with a.n.other in the first task. Basic collection of data: research the topic, Grab an image.  write some text. Ad the image and text. Add credit. Add tags. Title and publish. 




Share ? To class and tutor. To the wider world. To the LT only? 




Reflect on the activity. Open session heads away from the screen. 


View, review and provide feedback. 

Read student blogs and provide feedback.

Blog on your own. Press on with the activities. 


Read student blogs and provide feedback.


H800 EMA on Learning Schedule (OU MAODE) E-tivity Flowchart

PHASE ONE

TECHNICAL

LEARNING

SUPPORT

Learning Management System: Google Classroom

Web Design 

Solid, accessible, intuitive, familiar, up to date

Soft touch

Immediately test

AI or Human intervention where required

Support components

FAQs



Learning components: Videos, Reading, Quizzes, Assignments 





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Design Museum

E-learning design and development process @ Brightwave

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Edited by Jonathan Vernon, Thursday, 24 May 2012, 12:49

Brightwave%2520E-Learning%2520Process%2520SNIP.JPG

Brightwave's e-learning production process

 

Great to have a few months between modules as it gives me the opportunity to look beyond the MAODE modules at what interests me most: learnign and development in a corporate setting, the practicalities of enhancing the skills and building on the motivations and interests of people in their daily working lives.

The above chart adds detail to a familiar productoin process.

The benefit of turning to an outside supplier for such services (and for the the supplier to call upon the specialist skills of freelancers), is the accountability, the clarity of the stages, the parameters set by budgets and schedules and the lack of politics, as well as the engagement with a diversity of cultures, experiences and background which you simply do no get when everything is carried out in-house, the biggest bugbear of most providers in the the tertiary sector who insist on doing it all themselves.

Watch some of their videos

Particularly impressed with Laura Overton who I have heard speak at Learning Technologies in the past.

Laura%2520Overton%2520%2540%2520Brightwave.JPG

Laura Overton

Brightwave, quite rightly, include a transcript with these face paced, tightly edited, packed interviews.

This doesn't preclude the benefit of taking notes. I also cut and paste the transcript then go through highlighting, re-arranging the text and doing what Jakob Neilsen would call making it 'web friendly'.

Even if I don't share this online, the act of doing this is a vital way to engage and memorise the information.

I've come to understand in the last few days (B822 End of Module Exam) that a 'mnemonic' is any devise or technique that aids memory, so reading this start the mylenations process, comment and those tracks become established. Cut and paste, doing something of your own with the content, go follow the links, add links of your own, cut and paste into a blog (here or externally), then share it into Facebook or Twitter and pick up others who know more or less and can contribute.

All of this is a very human way og aggregating and securing knowledge.

Ideally everyone would be milling around my garden right now, we'd pick up the conversation, then drift away to other things.

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