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Ras Albert Williams

An inquiry into my systems practice for managing systemic change (Part 4)

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Edited by Albert Williams, Tuesday, 30 Jan 2018, 13:01

Invitation to investigate the link between Social Learning Systems and Communities of practice and disaster risk reduction and recovery.

Greetings all,

Let me take this opportunity to wish each and everyone of you a happy new year.

Introduction

With part two of TU812- Managing systemic change: Inquiry, action and interaction, under the bridge, and a heavily thumbed and lined Systems Practice: How to act in situations of uncertainty and complexity in a climate change world.  We turn our attention to to the wider involvement of the systems thinker in the inquiry into to Social learning systems and Communities of practice.

Although  I know that the submission date for TMA 03 is a few weeks away: March 22, 2018, Question 1 (b) asks us to reference sources, and provide evidence that a situation of interest that you have identified as in need of social learning has /is being discuss(ed) The question suggests that third-party perspectives could be obtained from one-one discussions, with family or friends, or in forums such as the module forum or among your peers in the workplace.

What we want to do

In light of this assignment, I am inviting fellow students who have previous experience of being a victim of a disaster, directly or indirectly; or who has been a volunteer in the aftermath or been involved with the management of resources to respond to a disaster. Alternatively, this post is for anyone who has a deep interest in environmental matters, particularly in discussing the issues around social learning systems  and Communities of practice as it relates to disaster risk reduction and recovery.

To begin, here is a graphical representation of the complex relationships between islands of the Caribbean, who share a common boundary of the Caribbean sea  and the atlantic Ocean geographically. However, the social history and development of each island or subsets of islands, within the Caribbean archipelago, could not be more varied on the question of  international relations, and colonial and post-colonial regulatory frameworks that governed how the British, French, Dutch and American governments responded during and in the wake the 2017 North Atlantic Hurricane season. In this scenario, we have many actors, including the survivors and the Caribbean diaspora. As well as a host of  humanitarian organisations and world bodies and agencies.

Background

The Commonwealth of Dominica was struck by Hurricane Maria on the 18-19th of September, 2017 which was perhaps the worst North Atlantic hurricane season on record. I was born in the UK, and lived in Dominica between 1972 and 2004 during which time I survived  Hurricane David in 1979.

Two major hurricanes ripped through the Caribbean with two weeks last year: Hurricane Irma on September 6 which killed over 134 persons and caused catastrophic damage in Barbuda, Saint Barthelemy, Sint Martin, Anguilla. the British Virgin Islands, United States Virgin Islands, Cuba and Florida. Two weeks later, Hurricane Maria, a category 5 hurricane almost totally obliterated  Dominica leaving over 96 persons dead or missing.

Questions

1 What lessons have been learned from this hurricane season?

2.What are your views on  climate-change?

3. Is there a case for the intervention of  Social learning Systems in the  Caribbean?

Final thoughts

Below is graphical representation taken from an IRIN News  article entitled Hurricane response: Caribbean disaster agency comes of age.

I decided to share this because it somewhat focuses the mind on on what we are discussing.  I sincerely hope that this thread will generate some discussion of the subject stated above in the days and weeks to come prior to our tutorial  on February 12 where I am looking forward to more guidance on getting to grips with the contribution of Sir Geoffrey Vickers, Donald Schön and others with this very illuminating aspect of managing systemic change.

Regards

Albert

A schematic representation of how European countries responded to hurricane disaster in the  Caribbean in 2017

                                                               A post-disaster map of Caribbean politics and aid status (IRIN. 2017)

 

References 

IRIN. (2017). Hurricane response: Caribbean disaster agency comes of age. [online] Available at: https://www.irinnews.org/analysis/2017/09/28/hurricane-response-caribbean-disaster-agency-comes-age [Accessed 30 Jan. 2018].

IRIN. (2017). Hurricane response: Caribbean disaster agency comes of age. [online] Available at: https://www.irinnews.org/analysis/2017/09/28/hurricane-response-caribbean-disaster-agency-comes-age [Accessed 30 Jan. 2018].

Euan McKirdy, C. (2018). Dominica PM: Hurricane Maria ‘devastates’ island. [online] CNN. Available at: https://edition.cnn.com/2017/09/18/americas/atlantic-storms-maria-jose-lee/index.html [Accessed 30 Jan. 2018].

IN. 2017)

 


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Ras Albert Williams

F36 MSc Technology Management update

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Edited by Albert Williams, Thursday, 12 Oct 2017, 09:04


Hi reader


The last time  i updated this blog was in March of this year. My wife Tempie. provided a brief overview of my journey thus far with The Open University, and my imminent commencement of a new era in my life, the pursual of a MSc in Technology Management.


In November, I begin the study of TU812- Managing Systemic Change: Inquiry, action and interaction

Modules that  I have studied thus far on the postgraduate program are:

I am already booked for the May.2018 start of:



I am on target to complete my MSc by 2019 with:


That is all for now.


Albert

N.B: I have since been granted professional  membership of the British Computer Society


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Ras Albert Williams

LEVEL ONE COURSES: TIP TOEING INTO THE FUTURE

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Edited by Albert Williams, Sunday, 21 Aug 2011, 14:17

Here I am at the first leg of my Open University experience as an adult learner, nearly fifty years old taking that leap of faith into distance education.

Having set my eyes on a BSc (Honours) in Computing and IT, I now stand confident that I will pass both the introductory courses M150 Data , Computing and Information, and T175 Networked Living: Exploring information and communication technologies. both were compulsory courses for this chosen degree and will be combined into one course form 2011.

I already have my results for M150 which is a pass and very confident that I will follow this success with a pass in T175. I am already signed up for TM128 Microsoft Servers Technologies and B120 An introduction to Business Studies, and it goes without saying that I am very excited about adding these two courses to my development plan.

Just to make a few observations about OU style of teaching. I have found that the university, especially in T175 goes out of their way to encourage you to adopt a timetable and to make use of your blog space, as an aid for reflection and meditation on your goals. I have found blogging in this way as a very useful tool, in helping me to reaffirm my goals and to continue on my journey.

I must hastily add though, that I am not a big fan of the forums, particularly the module forums. Tooooooooooo much whinging goes on there, as if the persons who make it a point of hanging out their dirty linen in the public, have been forced to avail themselves of the opportunities that OU have to offer. As regards the Elluminate service, I am equally surprised that a the majority of fellow students do not make use of the opportunity and also do not come to the tutorials which re all supposed to be for their own benefit.

For us adults who, have returned to education after, in many cases, decades, one would think that there would be a greater show of appreciation for the chance to at least try to achieve a higher qualification. appears not to be the case. and with the expected rise in university fees next year, new students will find it ever more difficult to find the resources to pay for their education through traditional means.

The future remains to be seen whether university attendance figures grow or fall. There is even the notion being promoted by fatalists that it is a waste of time to pursue a degree. (WHAT!) For one thing knowledge is power, and education provides one with alternative ways of thinking and even analytical skills to work out life problems such as , should I seek to be employed? am I employable? or should create my own job and strike out as a entrepreneur.

In my book, being over prepared for opportunities that may arise in the future, is much better than not even being able to stand a chance, because your skill set is nowhere near what the employers are looking for.

Well this is my humble opinion, at least.

(522 words)

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